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  • Mycotoxin Risk
  • Deactivation
  • Acidifiers
  • Feed preservation
  • Mycotoxins
  • Silage
  • Ruminants
  • Mycofix
  • FUMzyme
  • Biotronic
  • Gut Performance
  • Farmer
  • Feed Producer / Feed Mill
  • Pigs
  • Poultry

What to Do with Flooded Grain

How to deal with flooded corn, wheat and other stored crops


Renata Olejniczak

How to deal with flooded corn, wheat and other stored crops

Extreme weather conditions, especially in early spring, can mean local flooding. When rivers overrun their banks, floodwaters can penetrate grain storage facilities and render some of the stored feed unusable.

Contaminants pose a risk

The main danger from floodwater that reaches feedstuffs is that chemical or biological contaminants may be introduced. Contaminated surface water may also present microbiological hazards to pastures and drinking water with pathogens such as E. coli.

Reconditioning

According to the US FDA, already harvested crops deemed unsuitable for human food use may be reconditioned for animal feed on a case-by-case basis, subject to policy guidelines CPG Sec. 675.200 Diversion of Adulterated Food to Acceptable Animal Feed Use.

Salvaging stored grains

Grain stored in silos or flat magazines may be partially saved even when flooded, as moisture will not move more than 40-50 centimeters (15-20 inches) up above the water surface. Carefully separate the grain from the top that was not affected, and be sure not to mix it with the lower one that has been flooded.

Verifying feed safety

The FDA recommends testing crops harvested from flooded fields intended for animal food for a number of contaminants, including:

 - Mycotoxins such as aflatoxin and fumonisin
 - Heavy metals
 - Pathogenic bacteria
 - Chemicals

Further storage

It is important to protect grains from moisture and mold that could impair feed quality by following best practices for feed storage. Particular points to keep in mind:

1. Regularly measure moisture content with a goal of keeping it close to 14%

2. Consider the use of mold inhibitors and feed acidifiers to preserve feed quality

3. Regularly test for mycotoxins and apply a mycotoxin deactivator before feeding

Conclusions

  • Coping with flooding is a challenging and oftentimes stressful task. It’s important to put safety first and follow relevant guidelines and regulations to ensure the best outcome.